Aloha!

Just wanted to post the progress shot of a full back piece in progress. This pic was taken on the second day of work, as I broke the piece into halves. The left side was done on day one; the right completed the next day. This piece will also incorporate taulima Samoan elements in the final lower stages, the upper portion maintaining Maori and Marquesan motifs. When it is completed (by July) I will post the breakdown.

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This cover up is a combination of Maori and Marquesan motifs that roughly follows a Taulima (Samoan) structure. It does not cover his old gang tattoos completely as I felt that by leaving some of the old tattoo poking through, it could serve as a reminder of sorts, of his past, so that moving forward he could have a reminder so as not to stray from the path of righteousness.
The intent of this tattoo was more aesthetic but it does have a lot of personal meaning to him as well. Growth, protection and strength form the basis for this piece.
The breakdown is as follows:

a) Koru: unfurling fern head, Maori- Life, breath, new beginnings, growth and connection to the earth.

b) Ama kopeka: fire, Marquesan- To illuminate, to cast light upon. Used here to light his path moving forward.

c) Koniho: teeth marks, Marquesan- To protect from evil.

d) Ipu ao: bowl of the earth, Marquesan- Container of mana/power, creation, life, light.

e) Unaunahi: fish scales, Maori- Abundance. bounty of the sea. Here used to represent Hawaii and aloha.

f) Mata: eye, Marquesan- To watch over, protect.

g) Niho: teeth, Marquesan- Used to protect the tattoo and the wearer from harm.

h) Pepehipu: pounded tapa cloth, Marquesan- Worn as armor, covering tattoo underneath.

i) Hope vehine: twin goddesses, Marquesan- Very simplified version of motif meant to give life, protect and symbolize creation.

j) Enana kaake: troop of warriors going to battle, Marquesan- Sacred connection, common bond, fighting for a common cause (simplified version).

k) Hoka: rays of the sun, Marquesan- Courage.

Thank you for looking, and aloha!

Aloha!

I have begun a video series on YouTube, speaking about Polynesian tattoo. This is the first video of the series. I think in total there will be 8 or so videos and I will try to produce one a month. I am asking those that wish to comment, to do so here on my blog to keep all the information in one place. Because I am a cheap bastard I cannot upload video to my blog, I can only provide a link to the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=at0-G5yV5nE

Thank you for your time and aloha,

Roland

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Did this Ana’ole Polynesian style honu on the calf of a gentleman from Canada the other day. He wanted a piece that spoke of his marriage, his two sons, his love of the outdoors and nature, family, protection, new beginnings and love for the sea. The entire piece represents his love for the sea, which is why he chose the turtle in the first place. Super cool dude! Had a blast chatting it up with him and his wife. Hope to see them again soon.

Breakdown is as follows:

a) mata/maka= eyes. These two symbols represent his sons, individually. I placed them on either side of the turtle so that they are positions of observance, to watch out for him.

b) lei e ata te hae= wedding garland. This symbols represents he and his wife’s union, and is essentially a garland of individuals holding hands, connected together as the two families unite.

c) ani ata= sky/heaven/ancestors. This symbol reinforces the bottom symbol (b) and represents his ancestors looking down on him from the heavens essentially protecting and blessing his marriage.

d) kofati= crease/fold/plaiting. This diamond pattern represents a weave of fronds, such as pandanus or palm, and is an analog to nobility and the righteousness of the earth.

e) mata hoata= all seeing eyes. This protective symbol is used to watch out for impending danger and is a more elaborate version of the mata (a).

f) niho=teeth. This symbol of a closed mouth is meant to catch sin and protect as well as offer courage and strength. It is at the front of the turtle shell to protect the symbols the follow it.

g) ka’ake= upraised arms.  These two symbols represent upraised arms that are meant to convey power, force, and generosity.

h) koru=unfurling fern head. This Maori symbol represents the unfurling fern shoot and is meant to convey life, breath, new beginnings and the earth.

i) lei niho= garland of teeth. This motif is the same as ‘f’ only set into a lei, or garland.

All of the symbols are done in Fibonacci sequence in both number and form.

Thanks for looking!

Aloha!

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I am very proud to have been able to contribute to the launch of this phenomenal new product from Eikon Device. This is by far the most effective, cutting edge anti pathogen product out there. I only use products that I truly believe in and this is one of them. Not only is it exceptional at killing nasty pathogens but it also calms the skin and keeps redness and swelling to a minimum. I am able to tattoo longer with less irritation to the clients skin. Freshly finished tattoos look healed. No harsh chemicals and a neutral ph. Electrasyn is a game changer in the tattoo industry! Thank you for your time. Peace!

mark_bd mark Aloha! Here is an upper arm/shoulder piece that I finished recently in Hawaiian, Marquesan and Maori styles. This client wanted a piece that spoke of his life’s ordeals, his love of the sea, his children and new beginnings. I did the overall layout in a very subtle Samoan taulima style to better integrate all of the symbols. I kept it the coverage light and airy as opposed to the very heavy aesthetic of the taulima. It can easily added to and will wear better over time. Here is the breakdown of motifs: a) na niho, this collection of many teeth/sins is Hawaiian based and speaks of the obstacles that he has had to endure and overcome throughout his life. b) this combination of kiko (dot) and small dashes representing pohaku (stone) symbolize a beach or shoreline, this is to symbolize the flow from his past challenges (a) into the present, symbolized by the beach. c) kai/nalu, ocean and waves, to speak of his love for the sea. d) mata, eye(s) to look out and protect from harm as he moves into the future. e) lei niho, garland of teeth for protection of the overall tattoo. f) ipu oto, bowl/container, this symbol represents a container of mana (power) as well as creation of the universe. In this particular example I have incorporated 4 mata, 2 above, 2 below for protection. g) kea, turtle, these 2 turtle motifs, (that can also represent a person, enana or a god, etua) are there to symbolize his children. h) koru, these 4 mirror reflected fern heads, represent a new beginning, life and breath. The configuration in this instance is representative of the Maori mangopare, which is a pattern representing the  head of the hammerhead shark. i) henna, hand, this affixes the tattoo to the body. Thank you for taking the time to read my blog! Peace!

Aloha!

I thought that I would post some of the clay Scratchbord™ etchings that I have been doing lately. If you don’t know what a scratch board etching is, please let me explain: A scratch board is either a cut piece of clay (masonite) or paper, that has a slick white coated surface, underneath a thin veneer of flat black paint. Using a scraper tool (xacto knife, sculpting tools, or proper etching tools), the surface of the scratch board is slowly etched away to reveal the bright white (and some times gold, silver, or bronze) color beneath. Working from a reference, I have created many etchings, and here are some of the ones of late.

I started out doing sea life: turtles, an octopus, etc. then moved onto a celebrity, Lauren Bacall, and even a T-rex skull. Over the past month, I have decided to do etchings of musicians that have influenced me over the years.

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T-rex skull

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Octopus

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Lauren Bacall

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Sea turtle

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David Bowie

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Sea turtle 2

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Peter Tosh

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Debbie Harry

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Johnny Cash

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Frank Sinatra

I find that although etching and tattooing are worlds apart in almost every regard, there are similarities that help me to become a better tattoo artist. Etching requires patience, accuracy and utmost attention to detail; one wrong line and it all looks like hell. By focusing on these things, I have found that my tattooing technique has become much more honed. So, I do etchings on down days when I have no appointments, or between appointments if time allows.

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John Bonham

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Sid Vicious and Johnny Rotten (Sex Pistols)

Most of them are quite small, 8″x8″, the largest being 8.5″x11″. I even have a stack of playing card-sized scratch boards that I have yet to tackle. :)

Thank you for looking!

Aloha,

Roland