Archive for the ‘Xisle Custom Tattoo’ Category

Here is some Polynesian work that I’ve done lately as well as some other pieces.

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The goddess of the wind, La’amaomao is holding the ipu (calabash) of the 32 winds of Hawaii. The god Lono, is standing on her legs and is seen behind her. Lono is both the ipu and the winds itself, being the god of fertility and wind, among other things.

Client is a kitesurfer.

Modern Marquesan.

 

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Honu is mainly asthetic with some protection thrown in for good measure.

Ana’ole style.

 

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Shoulder cap of strength and growth imagery that is done to represent the talon of a raptor.

Modern Marquesan and taulima.

 

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Shoulder cap, done Ta Moko style (Maori) with taulima influences. This shows his love of family, strength and courage as well as his love of Hawaii.

 

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Ta Moko style upper calf band meant to protect from harm and to look out for danger.

 

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Side piece donw in modern Marquesan with Ta Moko influences. This piece is represents her travel, ancestors, family and growth.

 

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Modern Marquesan, freehand. This is all about power and retaining mana.

 

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Rapanui style, ‘iwa bird.

 

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Mo’o and Honu.

 

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Blue Heron.

 

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Honu and Big Island.

 

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Father and son matching Ku tattoo’s. I tattooed the father a few years ago and so he wanted his son to have the same.

 

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Modern Marquesan chest piece, cover up.

 

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Modern Marquesan, mata kome.

 

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Olive tree branch. In memory of his daughter, Olive. She passed shortly after being born.

 

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Modern Marquesan and Ta Moko, gauntlet. ‘Iwa lani, love of Hawaii and the ocean, his family and protection.

Kia Ora!
I am very pleased to announce that episode 2, Tattoo Nomad: North Island, New Zealand is finished and posted to my YouTube channel!
We had a blast making this episode even though it was a lot of work, lol.
Please watch and share!
We want to do more episodes and need some help getting the word out.
I can’t thank everyone enough for the continued support and hope that you enjoy our effort at making tattoo something to celebrate that can bring people together through shared love of this amazing art form.
Thank you for watching! Aloha!
vvvvv copy paste link below vvvvv
Hey, hey! We leave for New Zealand on Tuesday to film episode 2 of Tattoo Nomad!!!
We have crammed a ton of stuff into this trip and are going to take full advantage of the two week schedule to get as much content as we can into this episode. I can’t express how much I am looking forward to this trip because I have always wanted to visit since I was a kid.
I will be in Wellington from November 20-24th and will be tattooing during this time at the National Tattoo Museum of New Zealand. Please contact them https://www.facebook.com/TheNationalTattooMuseumOfNewZealand/
if you would like to book some tattoo time.
Stay tuned to my FB page for the usual photo dumps of hi-jinx and adventure!TN_NZ
Thank you for looking! Please share!
Aloha!

This is the first official episode of Tattoo Nomad!

It is more or less the format of the show going forward. I expect running time to increase to maybe 30 to 40 minutes as more content is added.

Please share and subscribe to my channel!

Thank you for looking! Aloha!

Here is a link to a project that I have been working on called, Tattoo Nomad. It was originally supposed to be a sizzle reel to stir up interest in the idea but became a full episode and so I have made it the pilot.

The format will evolve; I am working on episode one at the moment (Belgium) and can say that it is more polished. That being said, I’m happy with how this turned out and for all the support that I had making it.

In the pilot I talk about my history and the history of Polynesian tattoo in regards to Hawaii. In the tattoo portion, the importance of remembering our ancestors and respecting the past is the topic.

I plan on making more of these as time and funds permit so stay tuned.

Aloha!

 

Just got back from the Great London Tattoo Show and a guest spot at Trash Tattoo in Dendermonde, Belgium. What a fantastic time it was. Took a day or five to get used to the time change but after that I was good to go.

London is always sunny when I visit which prompts people to tell me to visit more often. I certainly would love to, since London is one of my favorite cities. We arrived a day after the Manchester bombing which was a bit unnerving. The whole place had a different vibe; not bad, just a kind of tension that seemed to infect everyone. But people soldiered on and apart from the presence of heavily armed police and incessant news coverage, it was quite pleasant.

I tattooed in Alexandra Palace which was a nice piece of old architecture. The show was busy and I did a neck piece on a gentleman, which was my highlight of the show.

Belgium took me by surprise. I didn’t really know what to expect and at first, I hate to say, but I had a bit of culture shock. Coming straight from London to the cobblestone streets of Dendermonde seemed like I had stepped back in time.

In a day or two, after gathering our wits about us, it began to make sense. And then it seduced me. I really like Belgium. Our hosts were very gracious and their shop was buzzing like a beehive from the moment it opened until the doors closed. It was an all female shop and the vibe was chill and welcoming; it was nice to see it doing so well.

We went to Brugge and Gent and had a great time in between days of me working like a dog.

And then we went to Amsterdam. Everyone should go to this place before they die. Needless to say, I enjoyed it to the fullest of my capabilities.

We did some filming for Tattoo Nomad, the show that I (and my wife) are producing. Belgium will be the first official episode. I am still waiting to release the pilot episode, which is about the Big Island and Polynesian tattoo, but have to wait as I entered it into a film festival and cannot show it publicly until I hear if I got accepted or not.

In the meantime, here are some pics that you may hopefully enjoy.

Aloha!

This week has been all about chest plates!

Two consecutive clients, completely unrelated and unknown to one another chose to get chest plates (and a shoulder piece) to chronicle their lives and loved ones.

I’m very happy with the results and am now so exhausted that all I can do is stare off into space as I contemplate going back to work next week, lol.

Here are the breakdowns of each piece.

Mahalo for looking!

Modern Maori, Marquesan and Hawaiian chest plate and shoulder piece

a) etua hena = hand of ancestor: holding the tattoo fast to the body

b) na ihe = spear(s): a weapon used by warriors, showing his warrior spirit and willingness to overcome

c) ka’ake = upraised arm: the entirety of ‘c’ encloses other elements of the tattoo and gives strength to the motifs that it surrounds. The entire paka represents, po’o kohe, or a section of bamboo. This symbolizes resiliency and tenacity and adds this quality to the symbols contained inside ‘c’

c.1) hala = past: this is the life that he has lived so far

c.2) ano = present: this is the life that he is currently leading

c.3) mua = future: this is his future life

d) mata = eye: this looks out and protects him from impending danger

e) niho = teeth: each tooth symbolizes each one of his children that happen to also be twins

f) koru = unfurling fern head: symbolizes life, breath, growth

f.1) koru = unfurling fern head: along with the above, this also represents his marriage and is in the shape of a heart (over his heart) to show love

g) lau niu = coconut fronds: each frond represents one year of being married (15 total)

h) hope vehine = twin goddesses (of tattoo): protection, union and beauty also acting to hold up this paka

 

 

Modern Marquesan and Maori chest plate done in Samoan taulima style

a) pepehipu = hammered section: this represents a hammered piece of tapa cloth it is inset with niho for protection

b) ihe o nalu = spear of waves: warrior, love of the sea

c) hoku = (shooting) star: illuminates his way forward

d) niho peata = teeth, fence: protective barrier against potential harm

e) koru = unfurling fern head: symbolizes life, breath, growth

f) lau niu = coconut frond: royalty

g) niho = teeth: two teeth joined together to symbolize his marriage, inset into a ka’ake (upraised arm) to give strength to their union

h) lei niho = garland of teeth: to protect from danger

i) mata = eye: this looks out and protects him from impending danger

j) mata tomoe = Death’s head: this is the unicorn of Polynesian tattoo as it was initially seen on the Langsdorff voyage to the Marquesas in the early 1800’s. It was chronicled by an illustration drawn on that voyage but the image was never seen again in future expeditions and any forthcoming information regarding it was ever given. I have re-imagined it, and designed it to be skull-like in appearance. It is said to represent death but also protection from death and acceptance of death, as well.