Posts Tagged ‘pele’

Just thought I would post yesterday’s work and give a status report on the book.
Ana’ole honu with Pele on its shell, done with some Marquesan kofati on flipper edges. This piece was for a lady that had been living here for some time but is now moving to the mainland for a job opportunity. She wanted something to remind her of the Big Island and so this was what I came up with. I wanted Pele to look organic, like she was a patina on the turtle’s shell.
As of now, I have 20+ odd pages of the book left to write/process/produce that I hope to have finished in the next few days. After that is done, I will finish my bibliography, toc and thank you’s and then edit! Woot! On time for July release. Aloha!lynnhonupele

This piece is a combination of two aspects of living on the Big Island that this person wanted immortalized on her body as a way to remember her time spent here as she moves forward in her journey.
The honu was a sacred animal to her, perhaps even aumakua to some degree, that she felt a connection with. The honu is done with Maori elements; the koru and kape. There are water elements as well that surround the turtle giving it a sense of movement.
Pele is done with Marquesan elements, particularly ama kopeka (billowing flame) of which there are 5 that frame Pele’s head. Inset to each flame are kea, (in this case turtle divinities), that speak of the divine power of Pele and fire as well as offering another analog to the protective qualities of the turtle shell (kea).
The entire piece is meant to convey movement, such as the turtle swimming through water, and the billowing of fire that is Pele.
I did not use any black in this piece although I may add some at a later date.
The lighter blue is a custom color, made for me by Adam E. He made two colors for me for which I am very humbled and grateful. πŸ™‚

inx naomibd

Breakdown:

a) koru: eternal life. I placed two koru, one filled and the other open to represent balance and give some sort of depth to the turtle as if it were swimming up through the water.
b) honu: turtle. The turtle shell is comprised of kape in Maori tradition and I also used the double spiral koru as well to break up the shell.
c) via: ocean. Ocean elements placed on trailing edges of each fin to represent water.
d) Pele, goddess of fire and ama kopeka, billowing flame. Pele is comprised of 5 billowing flames, each flame represents a mountain range found on the Big Island. Each flame is also inset with divine kea motifs that fortify the protective nature of the turtle shell and the overall tattoo.

Interestingly enough, the client also pointed out that the honu and Pele are meeting at their third eye which I did not intend to do, but works out well for the statement of the piece.

Aloha! Roland

This client came in and asked me (through a translator) to give him an Ana’ole piece that he wanted merged with an existing piece on his upper back. The mountain range (Patagonia) is from his homeland and was done by his friend. Because I have been moving toward incorporating more color into my Ana’ole pieces, I accepted the challenge of attempting to merge what is essentially 2D art with 3D art.

I choose not to utilize any color on my end, preferring to use gray shading alone as a way to merge the disparate styles. In the end I was very pleased with the way it turned out, as was the client.

He wanted a piece that reflected his new found aloha of Hawaii and because of the mountain range on his back I decided to compliment that with an image of Pele as a volcano, essentially creating the mountain range above her. The breakdown is as follows:

a) Pele, the Goddess of Fire represented as a volcano. Her tongue is sticking out in a display of power and ferocity.

b) Etua, godlings. These two figures represent the power of the goddess and support her by ‘holding’ her up. Since they are part of her this ‘support’ is reciprocal. Such duality is a common theme in Marquesan tattoo and sculpture.

c) Etua hands. Divine hands support Pele. this is fortified with two rows of niho, or teeth which protect the tattoo itself acting as a shield of sorts.

d) Koru. Maori fernhead representing the cycle of life and growth.

e) Aniata, or clouds on the water/horizon. A Marquesan motif that is found in many different forms with as many differing connotations. In this instance it is quite literal and is there to show where the top edge of Pele’s head meets the horizon. I have also faded the top edges to merge with the waterfall in the existing piece.

f) Koru.

g) Hope vehine. These are simplified hope vehine, or the backsides of two women touching. This motif is tied to protection as well as an homage to the Siamese twin goddesses of tattoo. On a female, this motif is called Kea, and is linked with the turtle(shell).

h) Maile leaves. These dual maile lei are symbols of unity, peace and the aloha spirit.

Peace!

Here is the breakdown of the semiotics or symbols used to create this tattoo. It is important to note that when a symbol has been repeated, as is typical of Polynesian tattoo, that the same numeral will be used to identify that symbol.

A characteristic of traditional Polynesian tattoo is the constant evolution, if you will, of the symbols themselves, whether it were applied to a war club, canoe or the body,etc. This constant evolution and tweaking of the symbol(s) has to do with the ‘function’ of that specific symbol in relation to how and where it is placed and in what context to the body or form. Because the Marquesan’s viewed themselves as being one with their personal and sacred possessions (which in turn gave them a direct tie to their divine creator and solidified their status amongst their respective tribe) the symbols themselves take on a ‘life’ of their own and will often appear different despite retaining their true meaning.

Therefore, if you see the symbol of nalu, for example, and it appears differently throughout the context of the tattoo know that it is indeed, a wave.

The client approached me wanting to combine three existing piece that she had in different locations on her body: The ‘cross’ symbol between her shoulder blades, the stylized tribal piece on her lower back and the circular motif on her ribs, respectively.

She paddles canoe and so wanted the overall piece to be representative of the ocean. She also wanted to mix traditional Marquesan with my own style, Ana’ole. We discussed some of the symbols that she wanted to incorporate, but the majority of them she left to me to compose. Here is what I came up with.

The following definitions will be stated by either their respective Hawaiian or Marquesan names first.

A

1: Nalu (ocean wave)– strength, power and beauty.
2: Poka’a (wooden shoulder support used to suspend and carry a pole)– strength, tenacity.
3: Mata Hoata (brilliant eyes, all seeing eyes)– a divine symbol of protection that keeps the wearer protected. Also intended to cause fear in the hearts of enemies.
4: ‘iwa (Frigate bird)– symbol of dualities, in this case meant to protect the wearer and lead her back to land should she become lost at sea. In this instance the bird is flying from the land out to sea and in doing so becomes a wave.
5: Tiki– symbols of divine creation, the row of 5 represents a number from Fibonacci Sequence (FS).
6: Nalu (ocean wave, Ana’ole style)– strength, power, beauty, inset with FS.
7: Ka’ake (raised arm)– considered by Gell (1998: Chapter 8.9, p176-7) to be a climbing symbol, I tend to agree with Handy (1922, plate XXVI) that the symbol is an upraised arm symbolizing strength and power. The ka’ake itself is comprised of a subset of symbols, most notably hope vehine which are a symbol of divine female siamese twins.
8: Niho (teeth)– teeth are used in contemporary Hawaiian tattoo to represent family members and/or the warrior spirit. It was used as an adjunct in Marquesan tattoo to fortify or protect the design. I also believe that it was used so prolifically because of the fact that many Polynesians were cannibals and this displayed such intent perfectly. It is used here as protection.
9: Lau ki (Ti leaf, Ana’ole style)–sacred to the god Lono and used to appease the gods, this symbol represents protection from evil spirits and good fortune.
10: Nalu (ocean wave, Ana’ole style)– inset with ka’ake and palm fronds, this is a symbol of shelter, strength and unity as well as royalty.
11: Hei poi’i (wreath of poi’i)–Poi’i were shellfish that the Marquesans and other Polynesians used as currency because they contained mother of pearl. This is a symbol of stature and prominence.
12: Etua (Godling)– etua symbolizes the divinity that they represent, in this case Kanaloa, god of the sea.
13: Ho’i’o (Fern head)– similar to the Maori koru, this symbol represents the cycle of life, of rebirths and new beginnings. It is a symbol that also naturally represents the Golden Ratio.

B

1: Poka’a (wooden shoulder support used to suspend and carry a pole)– strength, tenacity.
2: Mata Hoata (brilliant eyes, all seeing eyes)– a divine symbol of protection that keeps the wearer protected. Also intended to cause fear in the hearts of enemies.
3: Hala, ano, mua (past, present and future waves, Ana’ole style)– this symbol is one of personal growth and can be used to represent the leaving the hardships of the past while looking forward to a bright and prosperous future.
4: Niho (teeth)– teeth are used in contemporary Hawaiian tattoo to represent family members and/or the warrior spirit. It was used as an adjunct in Marquesan tattoo to fortify or protect the design. I also believe that it was used so prolifically because of the fact that many Polynesians were cannibals and this displayed such intent perfectly. It is used here as protection.
5: Ka la (the sun)– a symbol of power above all else save the divine, this positive symbol represents life, healing and peace. It is seen here with augmented with an ho’i’o.
6: Tiki (forward and backward facing divinities)– in this instance the tiki protect the wearer from adversity that she may encounter overtly or surreptitiously.

C

I apologize for the poor quality of this photo!

1: Lau pama (palm fronds)– represents royalty, shelter and unity.
2: Kea (turtle shell)– kea are considered the female equivalent of the male etua symbol and pertains specifically to turtles, turtle shells, and woodlouse. They are manifestations of divine power and protection.
3: Etua (Godling)– etua symbolizes the divinity that they represent, in this case Kanaloa, god of the sea.
4: Nalu (ocean wave)– strength, power and beauty.
5: Niho (teeth)– teeth are used in contemporary Hawaiian tattoo to represent family members and/or the warrior spirit. It was used as an adjunct in Marquesan tattoo to fortify or protect the design. I also believe that it was used so prolifically because of the fact that many Polynesians were cannibals and this displayed such intent perfectly. It is used here as protection.
6: Maka nui (all seeing eye, Ana’ole style)– this is a modernized symbol of the mata hoata and is imbedded with 2 niho to represent FS.
7: Pohaku wa wahi wa’a (stone hammer used to smash canoe hulls, Ana’ole style)– this symbol represents the tool used to smash the hulls of enemy canoes. It is used in this instance to demonstrate that the wearer is a paddler and bad ass.
8: ‘iwa (Frigate bird)– used in correlation with the first instance of ‘iwa on her back, this twin symbol of two ‘iwa converging to create the symbol, mata komoe or death mask is a protection symbol. This symbol ensures that the wearer will be protected from death by both the ‘iwa and the image of death itself.
9: Kea (turtle shell)– kea are considered the female equivalent of the male etua symbol and pertains specifically to turtles, turtle shells, and woodlouse. They are manifestations of divine power and protection.
10: Etua (Godling)– etua symbolizes the divinity that they represent, in this case Kanaloa, god of the sea. In this instance there are three alternating to coincide with FS.
11: Hikuhiku atu (bonito tails)– bonito are very strong and fast swimmers, this symbol imparts those characteristics to the wearer.
12: Ka’ake (raised arm)– considered by Gell (1998: Chapter 8.9, p176-7) to be a climbing symbol, I tend to agree with Handy (1922, plate XXVI) that the symbol is an upraised arm symbolizing strength and power. The ka’ake itself is comprised of a subset of symbols, most notably hope vehine which are a symbol of divine female siamese twins.
13: Tiki– symbols of divine creation.
14: Ho’i’o (Fern head)– similar to the Maori koru, this symbol represents the cycle of life, of rebirths and new beginnings. It is a symbol that also naturally represents the Golden Ratio.

All typographical errors are purely intentional. πŸ™‚

Thank you for your time and I hope that you enjoyed your stay. Aloha! Roland

Hi’iaka is Pele’s youngest sister and also the Goddess of Lightning. Not as hot headed as her older sister, she is still one akua that you don’t want trifle with.

10:15 on a Saturday night…

A little something that I drew up today. I was lazy and ended up doing the color digitally.

Pele, Goddess of Fire

I started this tattoo last month and it needs another hour or so before it is finished but I decided to post it anyway.

This client has been in before and is furthering his collection of Ana’ole Poly by adding a full sleeve. He is an avid waterman–paddles canoe and is a freediver as well– so he chose to go with an ocean-minded theme that reflected his love of the sea. I added other symbols that complemented his initial idea and this is what resulted.

Before I get into the explanations I want to say that one day I will learn to take a proper picture. I don’t know why I have no trouble shooting back up for Anna when she needs a second shooter at say, a wedding, but when it comes to shooting my own work, I screw the pooch. Oh well, I will get better!

Looking at the first picture, beginning from the left and moving to the right, you will first see the inside of his arm as if he were facing you head on with his palm turned toward you. Each consecutive picture moves around his arm with the last picture being the rear shot of his arm.

Starting from his wrist (and the image furthest to the left), the symbols progress as such:

There is a column of lightning that wraps around his wrist followed by a vine of maile with 4 leaves inset with momi (pearls) reflecting a FS. Inset into these two vines are the tips of the maile vines themselves.
From the side view (pic 3 from left) there are rain drops which segue into the lighting from that angle.
On the underside of his forearm (pics 4,5) are six wind-blown waves. Together all of these symbols create the rain on the ocean accompanied by lightning, suggesting power and perpetual change as well as joy, good fortune and growth. Rain is one of those symbols with balanced meanings with both positive and negative connotations.

Just below the inside elbow joint or ditch, are a trio of all seeing eyes which are surrounded by an unfurling palm frond (signifying growth) themselves crowned by five hawk feathers (hulu i’o) the combined ornament of all three symbols also carry the FS.
These compound symbols represent insight, protection from adversaries, nobility and growth.

Underneath these symbols are a row of shark teeth (niho mano) containing FS.

(Note: FS= Fibonacci Sequence, refer to past Ana’ole posts on this blog)

On the outside of his arm in the same general space (in the same pauku as the rain) are three waves (nalu) accompanied by two mini blade shaped paka which contain a total of three stars which symbolize strength, inspiration and hope. Below this pauku is the image of Pele (which I need to still finish).

Moving upward into the inside elbow crease is a symbol called Pohaku wa wahi wa’a, which was a stone hammer used to smash the hulls of enemy canoes. Ancient Hawaiian’s would sneak up on an enemy encampment in the dark of the night and smash their canoe hulls with this tool, and then slip away into the darkness. Since this person paddles canoe then I thought this image appropriate. Set into the blade of his axe-like weapon are a row on shark teeth (niho mano), three waves (nalu), and a spiral of ocean water.

Above this symbol lies another row of shark teeth reflecting a FS.

On his bicep is the god of the sea Kanaloa. He is adorned with water, waves and a small he’e (octopus) that pokes out from the bottom of his jaw.

The final symbol is located on his tricep and is an unfurling fiddle head fern set under the image of the sun. In the sun’s rays are FS as well. This part of the tattoo still needs a little work and is the part that I need to finish.

Total time:

18hrs

Equipment used:

Dragonfly, Rotary Works (machines)

5RL,15M

One (ink)

Peace!